FLOW AND COMPACTION PROPERTIES OF THE MODIFIED BIOMATERIAL POWDER DERIVED FROM THE TYMPANOTONUS FUSCATA SHELL

  • Kenneth C Ugoeze Department of Pharmaceutics & Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria.
  • Amarauche Chukwu Department of Pharmaceutical technology and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka.

Abstract

A modified biomaterial powder derived from Tympanotonus fuscata shell was evaluated for its flow and compaction properties towards possible application in the directly compressible technology of tablet production. The pulverized periwinkle shell was digested in hydrochloric acid, neutralized, precipitated with ortho-phosphoric acid, and dried to a constant weight at 60 ˚C. The product was coded MBPSP. The densities and flow parameters of MBPSP was assessed using a Stampf volumeter and the Kawakita model, while its compaction behaviour was assessed using the Heckel model. Emcompress® and Avicel PH 101® were employed as standards. The MBPSP powder showed evidence of densification and consolidation on tapping (bulk and tapped densities 0.42 ± 0.01 and 0.68 ± 0.01), while the angle of repose (35.18 ± 0.49), flow rate (8.94 ± 0.13 g/s) and Carr’s index (27.25 ± 0.05 %) indicated poor flowability. Assessment on the Kawakita model showed good cohesion and densification. Compacts formed from the powders showed minimal variation in weight (400 mg ± 5 %), were mechanically strong (hardness 97.45 ± 2.02 to 161.25 ± 2.60 N and friability (< 1 %).  Heckel model assessment showed that powders displayed a plastic behaviour on compaction. The flow and compact indices obtained for MBPSP were within the British Pharmacopoiea (BP) acceptable limits, and compared well with those of emcompress® and avicel PH 101®. Thus modified T. fuscata shell powder has a good potential as a directly compressible powder and further work may be required on it.

Keywords: Flow, compaction, modified, Tympanotonus fuscata, shell.

 

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Kenneth C Ugoeze, Department of Pharmaceutics & Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria.
Department of Pharmaceutics & Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Port Harcourt, Nigeria.
Amarauche Chukwu, Department of Pharmaceutical technology and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka.
Department of Pharmaceutical technology and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka.

References

1. Francis, H. (2006), “How are seashells created”? Scientific American, Available from www.scientificamerican.com. Retrieved on 7th January, 2015.
2. Olaniyan, C.I.O. (1978), “An introduction to West African animal ecology: Heinemann educational books, London and Ibadan. 2nd Edn; 170.
3. Olorunoje, G.S and Olalusi, O.C., “Periwinkle shell as alternative to coarse aggregate in lightweight concrete”, International Journal of Environmental; 2003; 1(1):231–236.
4. Edmund, J., “Sea shells & other mollusc found on West African shores & estuaries”. In: Descriptive manual of Janet Edmund. Ghana University press, Accra, 1978; 20, 100-101.
5. Buchaan, J.B., “Marine molluscs of Gold Coast of West Africa”. J. West African Sci. Assoc; 1954; 7:30-45.
6. Badmus, M.A.O, Audu, T.O.K. and Anyata, B.U., “Removal of lead ion from industrial waste waters by activated carbon prepared from periwinkle shell (Tympanotonus fuscatus)”. Turkish Journal of Engineering and Environmental Science 2007; 31:251– 263.
7. Job, O. F. (2008), “The durability characteristics of periwinkle shell concrete”. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Jos, Nigeria.
8. Jamabo, N. and Chinda. A., “Aspects of the ecology of Tympanotonous fuscatus var fuscatus (Linnaeus, 1758) in the mangrove swamps of the Upper Bonny River, Niger Delta, Nigeria”. Current Research Journal of Biological Sciences; 2010; 2(1): 42–47.
9. Mmom, P.C. and Arokoya, S.B., “Mangrove forest depletion, biodiversity loss and traditional resources management practices in the Niger Delta, Nigeria”. Research Journal of Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology, 2010; 2(1):28–34.
10. Powell, C.B, Hart, A.I. and Deekae, S., “Market survey of the periwinkle, Tympanotonus fuscatus in Rivers State: sizes, prices, trade routes and exploitation levels”. Proceedings of the 4th annual conference of the Fisheries Society of Nigeria (FISON), Port-Harcourt, Nigeria. 1985.
11. Ugoeze, K.C and Chukwu, A., “Preliminary evaluation of the properties of biomaterial of Tympanotonus fuscata shell as pharmaceutical excipient”. Int. Res. J. Pharm. 2015; 6(2):104-107.
12. Dahunsi, B.I.O. and Bamisaye, J.A., “Use of periwinkle shell ash (PSA) as partial replacement for cement in concrete”. Proceedings: Nigerian Materials Congress and Meeting of Nigerian Materials Research Society, Akure, Nigeria, 2002; 184–186.
13. Job, O.F; Umoh, A.A. and Nsikak, S.C., “Engineering properties of sand-crete blocks containing periwinkle shell ash and ordinary Portland cement”. International Journal of Civil Engineering, 2009; 1:18– 24.
14. Olutoge, F.A; Okeyinka, O.M. and Olaniyan, O.S., “Assessment of the suitability of periwinkle shell ash (PSA) as partial replacement for ordinary Portland cement (OPC) in concrete”. International Journal of Research and Reviews in Applied Sciences 2012; 10(3):428 - 434.
15. Olusola, K.O. and Umoh, A.A., “Strength characteristics of periwinkle shell ash blended cement concrete”. International Journal of Architecture, Engineering and Construction 2012; 1(4):213-220.
16. Ugoeze, K.C. and Chukwu, A.. Physico-Chemical Properties of a Modified Biomaterial from Tympanotonus Fuscata (Periwinkle) Shell Powder Considered As Pharmaceutical Excipient, Journal of Pharmaceutical and Allied Sciences, 2017; 14(1):2429.
17. Heckel, R.W. Density-pressure relationships in powder compaction, Trans. Metall. Soc. AIME, 1961; 221:671.
18. Heckel, R. W. An analysis of powder compaction phenomena. Trans. Metall. Soc. AIME., 1961; 221:1001-1008.
19. Kawakita, K and Ludde, K.H. Some consideration on powder compression equations, Powder Technol. 4(2):61-68.
20. Fell J.T. and Newton, J.M. (1970). Determination of tablet strength by the diametrical compression test, J. Pharm.Sci. 1970; 59:688-691.
21. Kawakita K.; Yamashiro M and Yuasa Y. An experimental study on the relationship between compressibility, fluidity and cohesion of powder solids at small tapping numbers, Powder Technol. 1983; 34:61-68.
22. Ertel K.D; Zoglio M.A.; Ritschel W.A. and Carstensen J.T. Physical aspects of wet granulation IV: effects of kneading time on dissolution rate and tablets properties, Drug Dev. Ind. Pharm. 1990; 16(6):963-981.
23. Odeku OA, Awe OO, Popoola B, Odeniyi MA, Itiola OA. Compression and mechanical properties of tablet formulations containing corn, sweet potato and cocoyam starches as binders. Pharm. Technol. 2005; 29(4):82-90.
24. Shangraw R.F.; Wallace J.W. and Bowers F.M. Morphology and functionality in tablets excipients for direct compression, Part 1, Pharm.Technol, 1981; 5:69-78.
25. Paronen P. and IIIka J., Porosity-pressure function, in: Pharmaceutical Powder Compaction Technology, Alderborn, G., Nystrom, C. Eds.; Marcel Dekker, Inc. New York, 1996, pp 55-75.
26. British Pharmacopoeia: Her Majesty Stationary Office, University Press, Cambridge, 2012: A326-A327.
Statistics
244 Views | 138 Downloads
How to Cite
1.
Ugoeze K, Chukwu A. FLOW AND COMPACTION PROPERTIES OF THE MODIFIED BIOMATERIAL POWDER DERIVED FROM THE TYMPANOTONUS FUSCATA SHELL. JDDT [Internet]. 20Apr.2018 [cited 31Oct.2020];8(2):181-7. Available from: http://www.jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/1708