Formulation and Physical Characterization of Bio-Degradable Chitosan-Poloxamer Gel Base for Local Drug Delivery

  • Prasanna T. Dahake Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences, Deemed to be University, Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra. https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0295-5751
  • Sudhindra M Baliga Sharad Pawar Dental College and Hospital, DMIMS (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4799-8205
  • Triveni Punse Smt. Kishoritai Bhoyar College of Pharmacy, Kampti, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.
  • Dinesh M Biyani Smt. Kishoritai Bhoyar College of Pharmacy, Kampti, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.
  • Neha Raut Smt. Kishoritai Bhoyar College of Pharmacy, Kampti, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.
  • Milind J Umekar Smt. Kishoritai Bhoyar College of Pharmacy, Kampti, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.

Abstract

Objective: Thermo-modulated in-situ hydrogel (TSHG) are formulated routinely utilizing poloxamer for extended drug release. However physical properties of such formulations may have some flaws, which can be rectified using a combination of polymers with better physical properties such as chitosan. The purpose of the present study was to fabricate biodegradable chitosan-poloxamer-based in-situ drug delivery systems and assessment of their physical properties.


Methods: The present chitosan-poloxamer gel base was formulated using a two-stage method. Initially, chitosan gel was prepared by dissolving 1% w/w chitosan in glacial acetic acid. The poloxamer gel was prepared using “cold method”. The final chitosan-poloxamer gel base was prepared by mixing equal amounts of both solutions and evaluated for physical and mechanical properties.


Result and Discussion: The DSC thermogram demonstrated no obvious interactions among ingredients or micellization temperature. The gelation temperature of the gel was between 27 and 330C. The pH was 7 with slight clarity. The viscosity of the gel ranged from 15.14 to 41.19 pa.s. The gel was syringable between 4-300C and biodegradable under physiological conditions. The mean particle size of the gel under SEM was found in the range of 300-554 nm.


Conclusion: After the evaluation of the formulation, it can be concluded that all the ingredients in the gel showed good compatibility with each other, which could form a stable and homogeneous gel with favorable mechanical and physical properties.


Keywords: chitosan, drug delivery system, hydrogels, poloxamer

Keywords: chitosan, drug delivery system, hydrogels, poloxamer

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Author Biographies

Sudhindra M Baliga, Sharad Pawar Dental College and Hospital, DMIMS (Deemed to be University), Sawangi (M), Wardha, Maharashtra, India.

Professor and Head,

Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry,

Triveni Punse, Smt. Kishoritai Bhoyar College of Pharmacy, Kampti, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.

Post-Graduate student,

Department of Pharmaceutics,

Dinesh M Biyani, Smt. Kishoritai Bhoyar College of Pharmacy, Kampti, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.

Professor,

Department of Pharmaceutics,

Neha Raut, Smt. Kishoritai Bhoyar College of Pharmacy, Kampti, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.

Assistant Professor, 

Department of Pharmaceutics, 

Milind J Umekar, Smt. Kishoritai Bhoyar College of Pharmacy, Kampti, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India.

Principal and Professor, 

Department of Pharmaceutics, 

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Dahake P, Baliga S, Punse T, Biyani D, Raut N, Umekar M. Formulation and Physical Characterization of Bio-Degradable Chitosan-Poloxamer Gel Base for Local Drug Delivery. JDDT [Internet]. 15Jul.2020 [cited 29Sep.2020];10(4):59-6. Available from: http://www.jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/4216