A REVIEW ON LEARNING AND MEMORY

  • Avneet Gupta Department of Pharmacology, Bhupal Nobles’ College of Pharmacy, Bhupal Nobles’ University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
  • Manish Pal Singh Department of Pharmacology, Bhupal Nobles’ College of Pharmacy, Bhupal Nobles’ University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India
  • S. Siddhraj Sisodia Department of Pharmacology, Bhupal Nobles’ College of Pharmacy, Bhupal Nobles’ University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

Abstract

Learning is defined as the acquisition of information and skills and subsequent retention of the information is called memory. Dementia is one of the ages related mental problems and characteristic symptom of various neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease which is age related. It is a progressive and neurodegenerative disorder. The analysis of the anatomical and physical bases of learning and memory is one of the great successes of modern neuroscience. The action of drugs on memory is more or less specific and serious depending on the memory system affected. So the present study is therefore focused on the various types of learning and memory.

Key Words: Learning, Memory, Dementia.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Author Biographies

Avneet Gupta, Department of Pharmacology, Bhupal Nobles’ College of Pharmacy, Bhupal Nobles’ University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

Department of Pharmacology, Bhupal Nobles’ College of Pharmacy, Bhupal Nobles’ University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

Manish Pal Singh, Department of Pharmacology, Bhupal Nobles’ College of Pharmacy, Bhupal Nobles’ University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

Department of Pharmacology, Bhupal Nobles’ College of Pharmacy, Bhupal Nobles’ University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

S. Siddhraj Sisodia, Department of Pharmacology, Bhupal Nobles’ College of Pharmacy, Bhupal Nobles’ University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

Department of Pharmacology, Bhupal Nobles’ College of Pharmacy, Bhupal Nobles’ University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India

References

1. Byrne JH. Learning and memory in aplysia and other invertebrates. Neurobiol Comparat Cognit 1990:293-315.
2. Kandel ER, Schwartz JH, Jessell TM. Principles of neural science. New York: McGraw-Hill 2000.
3. Kimble GA. Hilgard and Marquis conditioning and learning. 2nd Edition. New York: Appleton Century Crofts 1961:570.
4. Neuroscience research centre learning and memory. https://med.uth.edu/nrc/research/learning and memory
5. Roediger HL. Cognitive psychology of memory. Learning and memory: A comprehens referen 2008; 2:1-5.
6. Singh V. An ancient approach but turning into future potential source of therapeutics in Alzheimer’s disease. Int Res J Pharm 2015; 6(1):10.
7. Gross R. Psychology: The science of mind and behaviour 6th edition, Hachette UK 2010.
8. Bitterman ME, Menzel R, Fietz A, Schafer S. Classical conditioning of proboscis extension in honeybees (Apis mellifera). J Comparat Psychol 1983; 97:107-119.
9. Clark RE, Squire LR. Classical conditioning and brain system. Th Role Awaren Scien 1998; 280:77-81.
10. Pavlov IP. Conditioned reflexes. London: Oxford University Press 1927:430.
11. Cherry K. The psychology of learning; 2016(4). https://www.verywell.com/learning study guide 2795698
12. Skinner BF. The behaviour of organism: An experimental analysis. Cambridge, Massachusetts: BF Skinner Foundation 1938.
13. Skinner BF. Why we need teaching machines. Harva Educat Rev 1961; 31:377-398.
14. Baddeley AD, Hitch GJ. Working memory. The psychology of learning and motivation. Advan Res Theor 1974; 160:47-89.
15. Gagliano M, Renton M, Depczynski M, Mancuso S. Experience teaches plants to learn faster and forget slower in environments where it matters. Oecolog 2014; 175:63-72.
16. Wood DC. Habituation in Stentor: produced by mechanoreceptor channel modification. J Neuroscien 1988; 8(7):2254-8.
17. Bell J, Dale M. “Informal learning in the workplace”, Department for Education and Employment Research Report No. 134. London, England: Department for Education and Employment 1995.
18. Sperling G. “A model for visual memory tasks”. J Hum Fact Ergonom Socie 1963; 5(1):19-31.
19. Carlson NR. Psychology: the science of behavior. Boston, Mass: Allyn & Bacon; 2010.
20. Conrad R. “Acoustic confusions in immediate memory”. Brit J Psychol 1964; 55:75-84.
21. Baddeley AD. “The influence of acoustic and semantic similarity on long term memory for word sequences”. Quart J Experiment Psychol 1966; 18(4):302-9.
22. Scoville W.B. and Milner B. “Loss of recent memory after bilateral hippocampal lesions”. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry 1957; 20:11-21.
23. Koffka K. Principles of gestalt psychology. New York: Harcourt 1935:485.
24. Wickelgren WA. Context sensitive coding, associative memory and serial order in (speech) behaviour. Psychologic Rev 1969; 76:1-15.
25. Marek EA. Why the learning cycle? J Element Scien Educat 2008; 20(3):63-69.
26. Zull JE. The art of changing the brain, First edition stylus publishing, LLC 22883 Quicksilver Drive Sterling, Virginia 2002.
27. Kolb DA. Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall 1984.
28. Saul M. Stages of Memory encoding storage and retrieval. Cognit Psychol 2013 www.simplypsychogy.org/memory.html
29. Craik FIM, Tulving E. Depth of processing and the retention of words in episodic memory. J Experiment Psychol 1975; 104:268-294.
30. Huppert FA, Piercy M. Normal and abnormal forgetting in organic amnesia: effect of locus of lesion. Cort 1979; 15:385-390.
31. Moscovitch M. Memory: Why the engram is elusive. In Science of memory: Concepts. Edited by Roediger HL, Dudai Y and Fitzpatrick SM. 2007:17-21.
32. Tulving E. Cue-dependent forgetting. Americ Scient 1974; 62(1):74-82.
33. Nairne JS. Modeling distinctiveness: Implications for general memory theory. Distinctiven memo 2006:27-46.
Statistics
269 Views | 315 Downloads
How to Cite
1.
Gupta A, Singh M, Sisodia SS. A REVIEW ON LEARNING AND MEMORY. JDDT [Internet]. 15Mar.2018 [cited 31Oct.2020];8(2):153-7. Available from: http://www.jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/1671