STUDIES ON MICROCRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE OBTAINED FROM SACCHARUM OFFICINARUM 2: FLOW AND COMPACTION PROPERTIES

  • Nkemakolam Nwachukwu Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria
  • Kenneth Chinedu Ugoeze Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

Abstract

Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) derived from Saccharum officinarum stem was evaluated for its powder flow and compaction properties in order to assess its suitability as a potential direct compression excipient in tablet formulations.  Alpha (α) cellulose obtained from different sodium hydroxide and bleaching treatments of dried shred S. officinarum stem pulp were hydrolyzed with 2.5 N Hydrochloric acid (2.5 N HCl) to obtain MCC which was coded MCC-Sacc. This was compared with a commercial brand, Avicel PH 102. Results of some powder flow parameters were: Bulk and tapped density (0.41 ± 0.01 and 0.54 ± 0.01 g/mL) respectively, particle density (1.82  ± 0.10), porosity (81.69 ± 0.20), Carr’s index (31.47 ± 0.75 %), Hausner’s quotient (1.47), angle of repose (31.00 ± 1.00 °) and these indices indicate poor flowability. Kawakita model assessment of powder showed good densification and cohesiveness. Compacts of MCC-Sacc showed good uniformity of weight, friability, disintegration and mechanical strength. The Heckel model showed good plasticity and slippage of the material. Values obtained were comparable to Avicel PH 102 in terms of compressibility and mechanical strength, hence MCC-Sacc has a good potential for use as a pharmaceutical excipient in direct compression formulation procedure.

Keywords: Microcrystalline cellulose, Saccharum officinarum, Avicel PH 102, powder, compaction.

Keywords: Microcrystalline cellulose, Saccharum officinarum, Avicel PH 102, powder, compaction

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Author Biographies

Nkemakolam Nwachukwu, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Port  Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

Kenneth Chinedu Ugoeze, Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Port Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

Department of Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Port  Harcourt, Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria

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Nwachukwu N, Ugoeze K. STUDIES ON MICROCRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE OBTAINED FROM SACCHARUM OFFICINARUM 2: FLOW AND COMPACTION PROPERTIES. JDDT [Internet]. 14Mar.2018 [cited 30Oct.2020];8(2):54-9. Available from: http://www.jddtonline.info/index.php/jddt/article/view/1666